Today marks the end of my fourth year of writing daily haiku. It’s been a great experience, especially because of the wonderful feedback I’ve gotten from you, my readers, over the years, but I’ve decided that this next year will be my last.

I began Haiku Diem writing in the popular 5-7-5 pattern. (Five syllables for the first line, followed by seven for the second, and then five again for the third.) In Year Two, I shortened it to 3-5-3 in order to more closely approximate the sound of real Japanese haiku. The year after that, I took a break from any set patterns. This past year, I’ve beenĀ rotating among a number of patterns: 3-5-3 on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 5-7-5 on Tuesdays and Thursdays; 6 word haiku on Saturdays; and no set pattern on Sundays.

So, what do I have planned for Year Five?

I won’t be following any syllabic rules this final year, but that doesn’t mean the haiku will be totally random like they were in Year Three or on Sundays this past year. Instead, I’m going to try weaving an even more difficult pattern over the course of the entire year. From time to time over the past four years, I’ve written what I call haiku sequences, sets of haiku in which the first line of each haiku repeats the last line of the previous day’s. Here’s are a couple of examples, and here’s another. This year, I’m going to write a haiku sequence that runs through the entire year! For the 364 days after day 1 of the new year, every haiku will begin with the last line of the previous day’s haiku, and then, on day 365, the final haiku will end with the first line of haiku #1.

I hope I’ll be able to keep it up without writing myself into a corner at some point! I also hope I’ll continue to be as lucky as I’ve been the past four years, when no accidents or life issues or attacks of writer’s block or even simple spells of forgetfulness kept me from missing a single day. But most of all, as always, I hope you’ll enjoy the haiku.

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Year Five: Finale

6:44 pm July 8, 2014

Today marks the end of my fourth year of writing daily haiku. It’s been a great experience, especially because of the wonderful feedback I’ve gotten from you, my readers, over the years, but I’ve decided that this next year will be my last.

I began Haiku Diem writing in the popular 5-7-5 pattern. (Five syllables for the first line, followed by seven for the second, and then five again for the third.) In Year Two, I shortened it to 3-5-3 in order to more closely approximate the sound of real Japanese haiku. The year after that, I took a break from any set patterns. This past year, I’ve beenĀ rotating among a number of patterns: 3-5-3 on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 5-7-5 on Tuesdays and Thursdays; 6 word haiku on Saturdays; and no set pattern on Sundays.

So, what do I have planned for Year Five?

I won’t be following any syllabic rules this final year, but that doesn’t mean the haiku will be totally random like they were in Year Three or on Sundays this past year. Instead, I’m going to try weaving an even more difficult pattern over the course of the entire year. From time to time over the past four years, I’ve written what I call haiku sequences, sets of haiku in which the first line of each haiku repeats the last line of the previous day’s. Here’s are a couple of examples, and here’s another. This year, I’m going to write a haiku sequence that runs through the entire year! For the 364 days after day 1 of the new year, every haiku will begin with the last line of the previous day’s haiku, and then, on day 365, the final haiku will end with the first line of haiku #1.

I hope I’ll be able to keep it up without writing myself into a corner at some point! I also hope I’ll continue to be as lucky as I’ve been the past four years, when no accidents or life issues or attacks of writer’s block or even simple spells of forgetfulness kept me from missing a single day. But most of all, as always, I hope you’ll enjoy the haiku.